“Tramas del arte textil: geografías, tiempo y género”

“Tramas del arte textil: geografías, tiempo y género”

Ceci Arango / Diana Duque (Colombia)

World Textile Art

As a discipline, textile art or fiber art manifests itself in the connectivity between design, art and craftsmanship. In recent decades, the fields of art and art history have engendered a growing public, artistic, and scholarly interest in textile art.[1] In the last few decades, the fields of art and art history have engendered a growing public, artistic, and scholarly interest in fiber art.[1

The presence of Chilean Cecilia Vicuña's artistic, poetic and activist work in the Turbine Hall of the Tate Modern in London, her recognition by the Venice Biennale with the prestigious Golden Lion, and her recent retrospective in Colombia at the Miguel Urrutia Art Museum, are shining examples of the worldwide presence of textile art in art exhibitions and research projects examined in the media, social networks and numerous publications oriented towards art history.[2] The presence of Chilean artist Cecilia Vicuña in the Tate Modern's Turbine Hall in London, her recognition by the Venice Biennale with the prestigious Golden Lion, and her recent retrospective in Colombia at the Miguel Urrutia Art Museum, are shining examples of the global presence of textile art in art exhibitions and research projects examined in the media, social networks and numerous publications oriented towards art history.

In this way one can appreciate the deliberate study of a multifaceted field in its context of technique, medium, material and metaphor. In its cross-cultural interweaving with conceptual, participatory and performance art, textile art also offers a broad and fruitful medium of self-expression in which geopolitical, environmental and social challenges are highlighted.

As a physical and imaginary process, textile art supposes a useful language for political emancipation, or dissent-a radical tool, which according to philosopher Jacques Ranciere, "changes modes of sensible presentation and forms of enunciation by changing frames, scales or rhythms, by constructing new relations between appearance and reality, the singular and the common, the visible and its signification."[3][3

In a climate of global art and economy, textile art stands out as a cultural phenomenon through the resurgence and reinterpretation of the so-called 'domestic arts'. [4] Recognizing its cultural legacy, the evolution of textile art remains stubbornly linked to the artisanal work and indigenous knowledge of our ancestral cultures.

As part of the programming of the 25th anniversary of the biennial World Textile Art, we propose to undertake a dialogue between academics, gallery owners, and representatives of the international textile art world, addressing the themes of: SURtropias, or cultural, political, and artistic geographies; slowness as an artistic process; and the paradigm of gender in textile art.

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